Abortions in Alaska

Alaska has a new website about abortion. Governor Frank Murkowski signed a bill that required women be provided with “basic, medically accurate information to help them make informed decisions about their pregnancy options.”

The site contains fantastic pictures and some illustrations of babies in the womb from 2 weeks through birth. The second trimester photos are especially amazing.

Adoption is listed as an option, which I appreciate. It is described as a difficult thing to do. I am sure it is, but it doesn’t do a terribly good job of explaining the hero a birth mom can become to her baby and to the parents who so desperately want a child.

I commend this effort to bring the truth to women, but am sad with the dehumanization perpetrated in the word choice. I’m also disappointed in the lack of truth that is offered to women in the descriptions of abortion methods.

My critique (all emphasis mine):

METHODS USED PRIOR TO TWELVE WEEKS
(FOURTEEN WEEKS FROM THE LAST MENSTRUAL PERIOD)

Vacuum Aspiration

Seventy-nine percent (79.5%) of all abortion procedures done in Alaska in 2003 were done by the vacuum aspiration method.

There are a good number of women who will go outside Alaska for an abortion. Your federal tax dollars pay for it, too. Isn’t that nice?

A visit to the doctor’s office will be required before the procedure for a preliminary examination, ultrasound, laboratory testing, and to obtain informed consent.

This procedure can sometimes be accomplished during one long office visit or may require a second visit to complete the procedure. The actual vacuum aspiration procedure generally takes 10-30 minutes plus one to two hours for recovery.

There are several steps involved:
• A local anesthetic is used to block pain at the cervix (opening to the uterus).
• The cervix is gently opened to about the diameter of a fountain pen. This may be accompanied by menstrual-like cramps

Girls, can menstrual-like cramps ever be described as gentle?

• A cannula (a small, hollow tube) is inserted into the uterus
• A vacuum is applied and the uterine contents are extracted by this suction. This may cause some cramping.

Translation: The baby is violently torn limb from limb and her body parts are sucked through a tube and into a container where they will be identified and counted to be sure none were left inside.

Possible complications:
• incomplete abortion (more likely in the very early weeks of gestation) requiring a D&C
• infection
• retained blood clots in the uterus
• heavy bleeding
• uterine perforation
• cervical injury

And of course these complications all occur because of the gentle nature of the procedure.

Dilation and Curettage (D&C)

Although D&C was traditionally used for abortions, most surgical abortions are now done by vacuum aspiration. This procedure can be accomplished within 24 hours, including recovery time at the clinic.

D&C accounted for only one-half of 1% (0.5%) of all abortion procedures done in Alaska in 2003.

These are the steps involved:
• A local anesthetic is used to block pain at the cervix (opening to the uterus)
• The cervix is gently opened to about the diameter of a fountain pen. This may be accompanied by menstrual-like cramps.

Again…gentle…cramps? Whatever.

• A curette, a tiny metal loop, is used to gently scrape the walls of the uterus to remove fetal and placental tissues. This may cause some cramping.

There’s that word again! “Gently.” When an action results in the dismemberment and murder of a human child, it can hardly be described as gentle! And “fetal and placental tissues?” Imagine describing a fellow human as post-fetal tissue. Stupid. These words completely dehumanize the child in the womb and dehumanization is the first step to making genocide OK.

Possible complications:
• incomplete abortion (more likely in the very early weeks of gestation)
• infection
• retained blood clots in the uterus
• heavy bleeding
• uterine perforation
• cervical injury

METHODS USED AFTER TWELVE WEEKS
(FOURTEEN WEEKS FROM THE LAST MENSTRUAL PERIOD)

Dilation and Evacuation (D&E)

This procedure can usually be done within 24 to 48 hours. D&E procedures accounted for slightly less than 1% (0.9%) of all the abortion procedures done in Alaska in 2003.

The steps involved are:
• The cervix must be opened up (dilated) a bit wider for procedures in the second trimester.

Because when children are allowed to live, they grow and get bigger. That’s what human children do. That is evidence that they are alive and that this procedure kills them. If you let them go for long enough without killing them, they get to be big like you and me.

• After the cervix is dilated, anesthesia is given. This is often a combination of local anesthesia at the cervix as well as intravenous medication to reduce cramping and promote relaxation. This procedure can also be done under general anesthesia, that is the woman will be “sleeping?.
The uterine contents are then removed by vacuum aspiration.

“Uterine contents.” After birth, at least for now, it’s a baby. Before? Uterine contents. Again, dehumanization. It was done to Africans. It was done to Jews. It was even done to Terri Schiavo.

• After 14 weeks gestation, medical instruments like forceps are often used to grasp and remove fetal or placental tissue. It is not always possible to remove an intact fetus using this procedure, but it is safer for the woman than other procedures that could be used at this stage of pregnancy.

Translation: They tear up the baby before they kill her. Below one of the “possible complications” listed is “incomplete abortion.” The website defines “incomplete abortion” as follows:

    Fetal tissue or other products of pregnancy may not be completely emptied from the uterus. When this occurs, heavy or irregular bleeding and infection may result. Incomplete abortion often requires a repeat procedure such as a D&C. The reported rate of this complication is low: less than 1%.

That means they left some of the baby inside. Ooops! The result? The rotting flesh of the child causes an infection in the mother. Kinda gross, huh? It’s nice how the sanitize it with clincal words, isn’t it?

Possible complications:
• incomplete abortion
• infection
• anesthesia-related complications, like allergic reaction
• retained blood clots in the uterus
• heavy bleeding
• uterine perforation
• cervical injury

Dilation and extraction (D&X)

aka partial birth abortion

There were no D&X procedures done in Alaska in 2003. These procedures are performed later in the second trimester and into the third trimester. They are rare, and done to preserve the life or health of the woman. They might also be done when the fetus has already died in the uterus or has a fatal defect.

The steps are:
• The cervix must be opened up (dilated) and will take up to 24 to 48 hours. An absorbent material is placed in the cervix. As the material absorbs moisture, it slowly dilates the cervix. It may take more than one application of the material.
• After the cervix is dilated, anesthesia is given. This is often a combination of local anesthesia at the cervix as well as intravenous medication to help with pain control and relaxation. This procedure may also be done under general anesthesia.
• The uterine contents are then removed by the use of medical instruments such as forceps, curette, and suction. It is not always possible to remove an intact fetus using this procedure, but it may be safer for the woman than other procedures that could be used at this stage of pregnancy.

Even here we don’t learn about how the child’s skull is crushed and her brains sucked out. Where is the medical accuracy here? Why shouldn’t women learn about the truth? I would even be OK with them saying, “The uterine content’s skull is crushed and it’s brains are sucked out.”

Possible complications:
• infection
• heavy bleeding
• rare events related to surgery such as blood clots, stroke, or problems with anesthesia

THE EMOTIONAL SIDE OF ABORTION

Each woman having an abortion will experience the procedure differently from an emotional perspective based on the facts of her decision and her circumstances. Women often report having both positive and negative feelings after having an abortion. Women who say they feel comfortable with their decision before the procedure are less likely to report regret later. Some women say they have had conflicting feelings lasting a longer time. These feelings may include emptiness and guilt or sadness as well as relief. Women may be more likely to experience sadness, guilt, or have difficulty after the procedure if they were forced into a decision they didn’t want or they had previous depression or other mental health issues.

Counseling or support before and after an abortion is very important. If family or friends are not supportive of the woman’s decision, the feelings that appear after an abortion may be harder to handle. This is also true if the procedure was undertaken in secrecy or isolation. Talking with a professional counselor before having an abortion can help a woman understand the factors that are part of her decision and the feelings she may have afterward.

How is it that they attempt to deal with the emotional side of abortion without addressing the reason for the negative feelings women have afterwards? Could the emptiness be because she is, indeed, empty of the child she had within her? Could the guilt be because she knows she allowed her child to be murdered? Could the sadness be because she’ll never get that child back? Oh, right, we dehumanized the fetus. There is no reason, other than previous “mental health issues” to feel despair or guilt or emptiness.

I’ve even found websites on abortion by ministries to be sorely lacking when it comes to explaining God’s forgiveness to the repentant, so it would be way off for me to expect such a thing from a state website. It’s not too much to expect from mine, though.

I’ll remind those who have been part of an abortion to keep in mind that, “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness.” (1 John 1:9). We can’t make up for or repay God for the debt of what we think of as our “smallest” sins, so to think you cannot repay God for being involved in an abortion is accurate. God’s forgiveness cannot be earned. There is no need to earn what is given for free. Christ’s sacrifice was sufficient for all sins. Trusting in Christ’s sacrifice is so much more comforting than trusting in your own works. God is God - you can be sure He did it right.

Leave a Reply

 
 

This is a captcha-picture. It is used to prevent mass-access by robots. (see: www.captcha.net)

You must read and type the 5 chars within 0..9 and A..F, and submit the form.

  

Oh no, I cannot read this. Please, generate a